Posts Tagged as: apple

October 22, 2014

Retina OSX on the Original Macintosh

I saw this great post about how tiny the original Macintosh screen was compared with the current (and enormous) Retina 5K iMac screen.

So I thought I’d take the opposite approach. Below are 1-to-1 pixel mockups of how Mac OSX Yosemite would have appeared on the original Macintosh’s 512×342 pixel screen.

Enjoy!

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September 11, 2014

iPhone 6 Size Comparison

Watch the whole thing.

March 6, 2014

Is that a MacBook charger on the top of the World Trade Center?

While browsing the fantastic GigaPan image in Time.com’s amazing story about the new World Trade Center, I zoomed into the junk at the top of the spire and discovered what looks like a MacBook charger! Maybe they’re using some Apple hardware to control the lights? Or maybe it’s just a similar looking cable… Can anyone confirm this?

Here are some screenshots, followed by what the actual charger looks like.

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October 7, 2013

Steve Jobs and the Leadup to the iPhone

This New York Times article about Apple’s internal prep for the iPhone is a great read. One of my favorite quotes is about how Steve Jobs would belittle employees.

Very rarely did I see him become completely unglued — it happened, but mostly he just looked at you and very directly said in a very loud and stern voice, ‘You are [expletive] up my company,’ or, ‘If we fail, it will be because of you.’

Brutal.

August 7, 2013

Mac OSX’s Responsive Font Panel

My habit of unconsciously resizing my browser window surprised me when I accidentally resized the Fonts panel in OSX and discovered that it was “responsive.” Depending on the available width, it smartly switches between list views and dropdown menus, and removes non-crucial elements as space gets really tight.

Pretty cool.

July 10, 2013

The New iPhone and 120FPS Slow Motion Video

Apple is apparently testing a slow motion video feature for its next iPhone. This Petapixel article includes an example video of 120FPS slow motion, and it immedlately reminded me of Apple’s new “Designed by Apple in California” ads.

See for yourself.

120 FPS Demo:

Apple’s TV Ad: “Our Signature”

Slow motion video can create some beautifully sentimental moments, and it seems Apple is already utilizing it in its ads. Soon it’ll be our turn.

This also relates to the Apple strategy suggested by Marco Arment in his article, iOS7 As Defense. If true, this slow-motion feature would once again leapfrog other handset manufacturers, giving Apple another lead in the market. Judging by how few cameras can do 120FPS, I can’t imagine this is easy to achieve in a consumer device.

May 9, 2013

Pegatron and the iPhone 5s Speculation

After enlarging the logo of Apple’s manufacturing partner Pegatron, I found a hidden clue about the production of the upcoming iPhone 5s. I’m surprised nobody else found this sooner.

December 30, 2012

My Steve Jobs Email Story

As an Apple fan, one of the greatest thrills I’ve ever had was when I emailed Steve Jobs and he wrote back.

When it happened in 2010 I debated whether to talk about it online, and decided that as personal correspondence it wouldn’t be right to publish. But now, as more and more “Steve Jobs stories” bubble up to the surface more than a full year after his death, I thought it’s worth sharing as a reminder of his persona.

Here’s how it happened. Back in the summer of 2010 I was trying to take a photo with my iPhone 3Gs and the damn thing froze. It was completely frozen – not even the home button would work. Of all the years I’ve endured a sluggish iOS experience as an early adopter, this was the first time I was holding a completely frozen iPhone. This was huge, I thought. This needed to go straight to the top.

After restarting my iPhone I opened up the Mail app and fired off a friendly complaint to sjobs@apple.com. I’d heard that Steve Jobs used that email address, but I was skeptical about whether it was actually him. But what the hell – I was just venting.

I got a response in less than one minute:

What’s wrong?

So I wrote back with an accurate description of the bug. And when I got a reply it contained an apology, but with some classic Jobsian misdirection:

Sorry. Lots of bugs fixed in upcoming software release. Plus some cool new stuff too.

Very rarely did Steve Jobs apologize for anything. In fact, he’d only publicly apologized a handful of times. So at this point I was skeptical about whether this was Jobs, so to mark the occasion (and, a little bit, to mock the PR person I thought might have been emailing me) I wrote back that I accepted Steve Jobs’ apology and that we were still cool.

In retrospect I realize this comes across as kind of dick, so for that I owe the apology. But how often have we all regretted what we’d said (or hadn’t said) in important situations? You always think of a better line when you’re walking away.

So was it really Jobs? At the time my assumption was that emails to sjobs@apple.com got filtered through some elaborate system of public relations experts, secretaries, assistants, and other Apple staffers. Maybe, I thought, a tiny portion of those vetted emails would eventually make their way into Steve’s inbox. But I assumed the majority of the Emails from Steve Jobs that were out there had been written by PR folks, or at least initially drafted by them. Why would the CEO of one of the world’s most powerful companies be responding to random customers?

But now I realize it must have been Jobs for a few reasons.

First, Steve Jobs was a control freak. Would he really allow anyone other than himself to send an email from sjobs@apple.com where it could be quoted and attributed directly back to himself? Not likely.

Secondly, the fact that I got a response in less than one minute (accounting for the 3 hour NY to CA time difference) should have tipped me off that it was Jobs. There’s no way any sort of multi-person filtering/vetting system could process and reply to my email that quickly.

And lastly, I usually subscribe to Occam’s razor: the simplest explanation is usually the correct one.

Anyone who’s curious or still doubtful can download the raw email source here.

So that’s my Steve Jobs story. It’s not incredibly exciting or informative, but I’m proud to have had an interaction with such an important man.

And every so often just for kicks, I’ll search my email for “Steve Jobs” and find this thread. For me it’s a more personal reminder of what’s true for us all; that as long as we have these slick little pieces of technology in our pockets, Steve Jobs will never really be gone.

December 29, 2012

Windproof Umbrella Video

Even though this is a promotional video, it’s an amazing promotional video.

Sometimes the best advertisements are the ones that simply show the product being used. It’s true with many Apple ads, and it’s true here.

The umbrella featured above is the Senz Umbrella by Totes.

December 25, 2012

Comparing Canon’s 1Dc 4K Pixel Resolution

It looks like the camera pixel wars are evolving into the video front. Canon’s new 1Dc is aimed at pro photographers who want the best of both worlds; the ability to shoot video large enough to pull still frames from.

This promotional video is pretty impressive in showing off the capabilities of the new Canon 1Dc, and I like how honest they are about the tradeoffs of pulling stills from compressed video, VS shooting raw:

We know we’re not shooting RAW. We may see RAW in the next generation of DSLRs, so it does mean you do need to have things pretty spot on like exposure, white balance in-camera.

As far as promotional videos go, it’s extremely well done. But I thought I’d do a simple visual comparison of how the resolution stacks up, compared with a selection of common devices that are known for their impressive resolution.

The takeaway is that 4K does seem like an alternative to shooting stills when you want to be sure you’re capturing everything. Sacrificing about half the pixel count of a 5D Mark II is a small price to pay for making sure you get the shot. Available for a paltry $11,999 at B&H.

Tip of the hat to Canon Rumors.

October 30, 2012

Embedding a Tweet from an iPad

So it turns out that trying to embed a tweet from an iPad is a serious pain in the ass. Twitter hides its desktop version from iOS, so I needed to download a user agent switcher to fool the site into thinking I’m on a desktop.

Sidenote, I’m using an app called KissMyAgent. It does the job just fine, but its lack of tabs and quirky UI make me really appreciate how much thought goes into making a decent mobile web browser; it’s a lot more than just a web view.

So anyway, here’s a tweet embedded from an iPad. It’s a response from Newark Mayor Cory Booker responding to a person’s request for help about a fallen tree during hurricane Sandy. The fuck?

October 15, 2011

iPhone 4S and iPhone 3GS Camera Comparison

As someone who’s stuck it out with an iPhone 3GS for the past two years, my upgrade to the iPhone 4S has me most excited about its improved camera.

Today I went around Long Island City and took some side-by-side shots with both the 4S and the 3GS, then shrunk both sets of images down to the same size. You can click each image to see the 3GS version because I am amazing at Javascript.

Overall the 4S photos are sharper, a little brighter, and seem to display more dynamic range across the board. There’s also better flare control, as you can see in the last photo. This is by no means a scientific or accurate comparison – just a little real-world example of what types of improvements we can expect with the 4S.

Click the photos to see the 3GS version. Seriously, why aren’t you clicking already?

July 23, 2010

Pixel density comparison: iPhone 3 and iPhone 4

Clearly I’m not the first dude to weigh in here, but I wanted to get a real-world sense of the increased resolution on the iPhone 4’s “Retina Display.”

In these photos I’m holding an iPhone 3Gs in front of two computer displays running Apple’s iPhone Simulator. The Simulator is running a virtualized version of iOS 4.0.1 set to mimic the iPhone 4 device. The iPhone 4 simulator looks huge on the computer screens because today’s Macs have pixel densities in the 72-120 range, while the iPhone 4’s pixel density is 326.

Pre-dousing any flamey comments, I’m fully aware this is 100% unscientific so I offer this information purely for my own delight. That said, if you have something positive to share, surprise me. :-)

An iPhone 3Gs held roughly 30″ away from a 27″ iMac running a simulated iPhone 4 interface. Badass.

Same as above, but with a 1920×1080 display. I needed to hold the iPhone roughly 34″ away to get the sizes to match.

June 20, 2010

Using iPad as a: Google search

Think I’m finally “getting” the iPad. Here’s why:

August 28, 2009

iPhone’s Artist Icon Looks Like Bono

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March 16, 2009

PowerSquid + iPhone App = WANT

File this under “would someone please invent this for me?”

I already have a few of these types of “squid” power strips and they’re fantastic. But imagine if each one had a wi-fi chip so you could control the flow of power to each plug from an iPhone (or computer) app? That’s right – total mindfuck.

This way you could tag each individual outlet in your home (presumably you’d have a few of these babies scattered around) letting you turn anything on or off (or dim it) while either not getting off your ass or from another location. You could also program the iPhone app’s acceleratometer (assuming Apple lets us run background apps eventually) to detect if you’re out and about, turning off a specified set of lights and electronics in your home. …Or if the software hooked into the iPhone’s microphone you could make it a modern overpriced version of “The Clapper.” …Or you could have it automatically adjust the lighting based on the mood of the music it hears. …Or you could just talk to the damn thing. “Turn off the goddamn coffee machine.”

There are tons of other cool things you could do with this (many of which are marginally, if at all useful), but the possibilities are so endless that to me it just seems like a good fit.

I’m sure similar things exist already, but my hunch is that if someone came along and presented a polished, cheap, turn-key system they’d make a killing. Just not in this economy.

November 20, 2008

Uptime

Geeky but fun question – how long has it been since you’ve restarted your computer? (If you’re a Mac user, the best way to find out is to open up the “Terminal” program inside your Applications > Utilities folder and type “uptime” without the quotes, then press return. Shazam.)

To the comments!

July 31, 2008

Hubris

Every once in a while I click on some spam I’ve received (just for fun) and I’m taken to some bogus site that automatically forces me to download an .exe file. And as a Mac user I just sit back and laugh as I put that .exe file in the trash and go about my business.

I love spitting in the face of danger. Hubris never tasted so good.

March 29, 2008

NYC Subways Use Apple’s Keynote Software

Has anyone else noticed that the displays on the new NYC subways seem to use Apple’s Keynote presentation software? If you’ve ever used Keynote, pay attention to the transitions and you’ll recognize all your favorites – Cube, Dissolve, Pop – they’re all there!

Does anyone know if they actually have a little Mac running the show inside every subway, or if it’s just a video file looping?

March 25, 2008

Time Machine and Photoshop Preferences

Hey everyone – miss me? I don’t know how you survived yesterday without a new caption contest, but I’m back from a little vacation (Anna and I went to Mexico) so it’s onward with the caption contests, shit jokes, and other useless diversions.

Case in point – I just discovered another nifty use of Apple’s Time Machine. Ever launch Photoshop and suddenly all the pallets and preferences are set to the default (ie, moron) settings? It happens to me about once every few months. For some reason the preferences file (~/Library/Preferences/Adobe Photoshop CS3 Settings) occasionally gets corrupted and reset to the factory default. But with Time Machine, just browse back to a time when you knew everything was peachy, and restore that sucker. Just worked fine for me.

March 20, 2008

SWF and PDF icons look similar in OSX

I noticed something pretty annoying while cleaning up my desktop today. The icons for SWFs and PDFs look very similar, and as a result are hard to quickly identify when viewed as thumbnails. This is probably the worst thing in the world.

March 10, 2008

Balls of steel: Intentionally erasing my iTunes Music Library

Another reason why I love my Mac. This weekend I needed to edit some video in a pinch. The project was going to take about 20 gigs of hard drive space but I was away from my external hard drive and only had about 10 gigs of free space on my laptop. So what did I do? I did what any Mac user would do – I deleted my entire iTunes music folder. It cleared up about 65 gigs of space, and I was able to edit the video and all was well. Then when I got back home I restored all the files with Time Machine, which had automatically backed everything up. That’s how badass I am.

February 23, 2008

Why no Mac or UNIX errors on billboards and kiosks?

I spotted this Fandango ticket machine sporting a Windows dialogue box a few weeks ago and my fancy was, as is to be expected, tickled. I’m obviously not the first person to document these types of amusing Windows error messages before (a few examples are here, here, and here).

Common reactions to these error messages usually revolve around how much Windows sucks. While I do agree with that statement, it’s not a fair explanation of the ubiquity of these error messages. Instead, I think it’s just a numbers game. Since Windows computers are cheaper and easier to configure for kiosks/billboards than Macs, you’re more likely to see more error messages on them.

But what about UNIX? I’m no expert, but my understanding is that it’s just as cheap, if not cheaper, to put together a small and portable UNIX machine that would be perfect for a billboard or kiosk. So why haven’t we seen any UNIX error messages?

Got an image of a UNIX or a Mac error message on a billboard or a kiosk? Hook it up in the comments. And to help fan the flames… Windows sucks. Macs rule. And UNIX is confusing.

January 27, 2008

Apple Soundtrack

As if all the sound effects of the Mac OSX interface weren’t annoying enough, I decided to take things a step too far. Enjoy!

UPDATE: Due to popular demand, I’m posting the GarageBand file I created that’s responsible for this madness. Feel free to have your way with it. Download the zip here. Also, here’s an m4a audio file for those brave souls who want to risk this song suddenly coming on during a Party Shuffle.

January 24, 2008

iPhone Friend Locator – Kinda Proof of Concept

Here’s a pretty cool idea I wouldn’t mind seeing incorporated into the iPhone: the ability to see where your friends are on the Google Maps application. (By friends, I mean your friends with iPhones or other locatable devices.) For security, it would only allow you to look for and be found by people in your list of contacts. Here’s a mockup of how it would look if someone’s looking for you. Bitchin.

January 22, 2008

Graphic Designer Prank

Hate your job as a graphic designer? Don’t forget to do this before you quit.

January 18, 2008

iPhone Gripe

A cool feature I noticed about the iPhone is that I don’t need to eject it from iTunes before unplugging it from my computer. Why can’t Apple figure out how to do this with a friggin iPod???

January 9, 2008

InDesign CS3 Benchmarks

While the web is buzzing with reports about how much faster Photoshop CS3 is on Intel Macs, there’s nary an article on the impressive speed improvements in InDesign CS3. As of this writing, if you search for "indesign benchmarks" or "indesign cs3 benchmarks" you get an astonishing combined total of one result (compared to about 2,000 results for "photoshop benchmarks" and "photoshop cs3 benchmarks").

So I fired up InDesign CS2 and CS3, whipped out my stopwatch, and set out to do some InDesign CS3 benchmarks of my own. And you thought your Wednesday night was awesome!

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The iPhone auto-suggests TriBeCa but not SoHo

I discovered this morning that the iPhone is so hip, it’ll auto-suggest the proper spelling of TriBeCa. But interestingly (that is, if you find this stuff interesting, which is doubtful) it won’t auto-suggest “SoHo” when you type soho.

November 18, 2007

Apple Time Lapse

If you’ve ever wondered what 48 hours of apple rot looks like in ten seconds, look no further.

And for more fun, check out the interactive version after the jump…

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